Kamworor wins Kenyan trials but will skip African event

NAIROBI World champion Geoffrey Kamworor won the Kenyan Cross Country trials on Saturday but pulled out of the team for next month's African Cross Country Championships in Cameroon, saying the event did not fit in with his preparations for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics in August.World silver medalist Bedan Karoki, who finished behind Kamworor, and third-placed African champion Leonard Barsoton also said they would not take part in the continental event in Yaounde on March 12."The national trials were important to me but I will not compete at the Africa cross country. I am planning to defend my world half marathon title next month," Kamworor told reporters. "I have styled my races and training toward the Rio Olympics where I hope to challenge Mo Farah (of Britain) in the 10,000 meters. I have learned from the mistakes I made in past competitions," he said after sprinting the final meters to cross the finish line in 28 minutes 19.6 seconds, ahead of Karoki in 28:24.3. The 21st IAAF World Half Marathon Championships will be held in Cardiff on March. 25. African cross country bronze medalist and 10,000m champion Alice Aprot won the women's 10-km event in 31:13.2, beating Beatrice Mutai who clocked 33:28.2. (Writing by George Obulutsa; editing by Clare Fallon)

Read more

Kanye West's new album and fashion show draw 20 million viewers

LOS ANGELES More than 20 million viewers watched rapper and fashion designer Kanye West put his own twist on a New York Fashion Week runway show on Thursday as he debuted a new album and clothing collection at famed music venue Madison Square Garden. West, his reality star wife Kim Kardashian and her family, including former NBA basketball player Lamar Odom, entered the Manhattan venue to cheers from the audience. It is the first time Odom, the estranged husband of Khloe Kardashian, has been seen in public since he fell into a coma after using cocaine at a brothel last October and was hospitalized. The was streamed for free online via subscription music streaming service Tidal, garnering around 20 million viewers according to the platform. Tidal, which touts hi-fidelity streaming, is co-owned by a group of music's top artists including West, Jay Z, Rihanna and Beyonce. As West played new tracks for his upcoming "The Life of Pablo" album, dozens of models were unveiled standing on raised platforms in the center of the arena, wearing the new Yeezy Season 3 that West designed for sports brand Adidas. The collection, launched on the first day of the city's fashion week, featured West's penchant for neutral tones but included bright pops of pink, red and orange across the collection of leotards, tops, leggings and parkas worn by a diverse group of models. West also announced an upcoming video game called "Only Once," which he said was about his late mother Donda West's journey to the gates of heaven.The show quickly became a top social media trend, as fans tweeted about the collection and the music. One particular explicit lyric regarding Taylor Swift on new track "Famous" garnered a strong response from fans as West rapped that he had made the pop star famous, referring to the their infamous 2009 MTV Video Music Awards incident where West interrupted Swift's acceptance speech on stage. Swift and West had since buried the hatchet, but fans speculated the new lyrics could incite a feud between the two music stars. Also getting in on the action, former drug executive Martin Shkreli tweeted out a letter addressed to West offering to buy "The Life of Pablo" for $10 million so that it would be released solely to him, and kept from the public. Shkreli is currently being sued over his Wu-Tang album "Once Upon A Time in Shaolin," the sole copy of which he bought for $2 million. West has yet to respond to Shkreli. (Story refiles to add dropped word "streaming" in paragraph 4) (Reporting by Piya Sinha-Roy; Editing by Andrew Hay)

Read more

'To Kill a Mockingbird' headed for Broadway debut

NEW YORK Harper Lee's classic novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" is coming to Broadway for the first time in a new stage version written by "West Wing" writer Aaron Sorkin, producers said on Wednesday.The Pulitzer Prize-winning 1960 novel about racism and injustice in the American south will make its Broadway debut in the 2017-2018 season, producer Scott Rudin said.Although the book was made into an Oscar-winning movie in 1962, starring Gregory Peck as noble lawyer Atticus Finch, and has been produced for the stage in various U.S. cities and in London, this will be the first time "Mockingbird" will be seen on Broadway.Lee's novel has sold more than 50 million copies and was thought to be the author's only book until an unpublished manuscript featuring some of the same characters was found and published last year called "Go Set A Watchman." "Watchman," described as a first draft of "Mockingbird," astounded readers and critics by portraying the heroic Finch as a racist who supported segregation. Sorkin is best known as the creator of the Emmy-winning White House television series "West Wing" and an Oscar-winner for the screenplay of "The Social Network." (Reporting By Jill Serjeant; Editing by Nick Zieminski)

Read more

Blue Jay Donaldson signs two-year contract extension

Third baseman Josh Donaldson, the American League's Most Valuable Player in 2015, has signed a two-year, $28.65 million contract extension with the Toronto Blue Jays, the Major League Baseball team said on Wednesday.Donaldson, 30, will earn $11.65 million in 2016 and $17 million in 2017, the Blue Jays said in a statement.Traded to Toronto by the Oakland Athletics before the start of the 2015 season, Donaldson thrived with his new team and helped them end a 22-year absence in the postseason by claiming the American League (AL) East crown. He clouted 41 home runs, drove in an AL-leading 123 runs for the high-powered Toronto attack, and batted .297. Donaldson was named as a starter to the 2015 MLB All-Star Game after earning the most fan votes, received the Hank Aaron Award as the AL's best hitter and won his first Silver Slugger award at third base. (Reporting by Mark Lamport-Stokes in Los Angeles; Editing by Andrew Both)

Read more

Warner settles 'Happy Birthday' copyright suit for $14 million

The copyright to the world's most popular song, "Happy Birthday to You," has been in dispute for decades, but if an agreement by Warner/Chappell Music to pay $14 million to end a lawsuit over the song is approved by a U.S. court, it will be free for all to use as they please. The settlement, unveiled in federal court in Los Angeles on Monday, would eliminate the music publisher's claimed ownership of the song. It also specifies that once the settlement is approved by the court, the song will be in the public domain. A hearing is scheduled for March 14. A group of artists and filmmakers filed a class action lawsuit in 2013 against Warner/Chappell, the music publishing arm of privately held Warner Music Group. In a court filing on Monday, the group hailed the settlement as "unquestionably an excellent result." "We are pleased to bring this matter to resolution," a Warner/Chappell spokeswoman said in a statement on Tuesday. The settlement money will be distributed among those who paid licensing fees for the song back to 1949.In September, Chief U.S. District Judge George King ruled that Warner/Chappell, the music publishing arm of privately owned Warner Music Group, did not have a valid copyright claim to the song's lyrics. The case garnered attention from around the world not only because the tune is so commonly performed, but because many people were not aware it was still under copyright, let alone purportedly owned by a major corporation.People who sing "Happy Birthday" in their homes or at private gatherings have typically never been at risk of a lawsuit. But when the song was used for commercial purposes, such as in films, Warner demanded payment and took in an estimated $2 million in royalties for such uses each year. The song has a complicated history reaching back to the 1893 publication of "Good Morning to All," a children's song written by a Kentucky woman named Mildred Hill and her sister, Patty. That melody eventually came to be sung with the familiar "Happy Birthday" lyrics.Warner contended its copyright to the lyrics came through the Hill sisters' publisher that it had acquired. But King said that publisher never obtained the rights to the lyrics and so neither did Warner.(The story was refiled to correct the date of the hearing to March 14 from March 4, in paragraph two)

Read more
Older Post